How To Brew: Pour Over

FOR A CLEAN, CLEAR & CONSISTENTLY BRIGHT CUP

Whether you’re a new home brewer or a seasoned barista, making your coffee with a pour over method can work for you.  Pour overs accentuate intricate flavors when compared to other brewing methods. This makes it a popular choice for good quality specialty coffee since it allows the flavors and aromas to shine. While some may be baffled by the time and intricacies poured into making one cup of coffee, once you  taste the results of a well brewed pour over, your skepticism will begin to erode away and the calming motion of pouring water over coffee will become a meditative part of your morning routine. *we brewed in a Chemex for the video above

WHAT YOU NEED

    • WHOLE BEAN COFFEE
    • BURR GRINDER
    • POUR OVER COFFEE MAKER
    • COFFEE FILTER
    • HOT WATER JUST OFF THE BOIL (200-205°F)
    • DIGITAL COFFEE SCALE
    • GOOSENECK KETTLE

DIRECTIONS

1. RINSE THE FILTER: Fold the filter into a cone shape and rinse it in your pour over dripper with water just off the boil (about 205°F) to eliminate paper flavor and to heat up the mug or carafe you are brewing into. Discard the rinse water.

2. GRIND & MEASURE: The amount of coffee and water varies depending on the type of coffee you are brewing and your preferred strength. As a starting point, we recommend using 50 grams of coffee and 800 grams of water for a Chemex (1:16 ratio) and 21 grams of coffee and 360 grams of water for cone-shaped pour over brewers.

[Chemex] Grind 50 grams of coffee to medium-course setting resembling sea salt.

[Cone-shaped pour over brewers] Grind 21 grams of coffee to a medium-fine setting to be as fine a kosher salt.

Pour your coffee into your coffee filter and shake slightly to flatten the bed.

3. THE BLOOM: There will be four pours total, and this is the first. Saturate the grounds with water right off the boil (about 205°F) by using just enough water to cover the grounds. Starting at the bed's center, gently pour about twice the amount of water that you have coffee into your grounds (for example, 100 grams of water if you have 50 grams of coffee) Let it bloom for 30-45 seconds. Coffee de-gasses or “blooms” when it’s fresh–the coffee bed should raise up and bubble a bit. A solid bloom ensures even saturation.

4. POUR: Starting in the center of the grounds, pour in a slow and steady spiral toward the outer edge and then back toward the center. Repeat the same pour pattern in 3 equal pours until you yield the amount of coffee you need. 

[Chemmex] we recommend using 50 grams of coffee and 800 grams of water (1:16 ratio)

[Cone-shaped pour over brewers] you should pour continuously until you reach 360 grams for a 10 oz cup of coffee (if using 21 grams coffee initially).

Allow the water to drip through the grounds entirely.

ENJOY!

    PRO TIPS

    • Always use fresh coffee, and adjust your grind and proportions to taste.
    • You should pour in slow and steady spirals to keep things even. A  gooseneck kettle really helps you with precision
    • When pouring - avoid the light spots, go toward the dark
    • Don’t use water to make coffee that you wouldn’t drink. Clean water = clean coffee. You’ll want your water to be at around 205 degrees or about 30 seconds off the boil.
    • Using a consistent water to coffee ratio will help you with your dose. Then you can adjust for taste. As a general rule, we suggest about a 1:16, coffee to water weight ratio to start. In other words, for the Chemex we use 50 grams of coffee and about 800 grams of water.

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